Panduan plpg



Download 4.61 Mb.
Page220/410
Date15.04.2019
Size4.61 Mb.
1   ...   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   ...   410
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Competence 

Trainees understand and are 

able to explain: PRINCIPLES 

OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE  

TEACHING AND LEARNING 

Trainees understand and are able to 

explain: LANGUAGE THEORIES 

 

Trainees understand and are 



able to apply: FOREIGN 

LANGUAGE TEACHING 

METHODS 

Trainees understand,  

explain, and apply: 

PRINCIPLES OF 

INSTRUCTIONAL 

DESIGN 


Trainees understand, 

explain, and apply: 

LANGUAGE  

LEARNING 

EVALUATION 

 

Trainees understand, 



explain and apply: 

LANGUAGE 

TEACHING MEDIA 

Trainees understand, 

explain and produce: 

VARIOUS TYPES OF 

ENGLISH TEXT 

INTERPERSONAL  

TEXT 

INTERRACTIONAL 



TEXT 

LONG AND SHORT  

FUNCTIONAL TEXT 



 

 

 

 

Learning Strategies or Stages to Master the Subject 

To achieve these objectives, trainees are expected to study by themselves as well as with 

peers the contents of each chapter. They have to make sure to master each  chapter well. In so 

doing, they can go through the following activities: 

1.

 



Read carefully the discussion of each chapter

 

2.



 

Pay attention to some examples or illustrations

 

3.

 



Have great understanding on each terminology and concept

 

4.



 

Do all the exercises (use dictionary of  linguistics and or applied linguistics)

 

5.

 



Evaluate yourself by checking the answers with the key provided 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 




 

 

 



 

 

 



Table of Content 

 

 

PART I 



RELEVANT THEORY 

 

 



Chapter 1

 

THEORY OF LANGUAGE AND LANGUAGE LEARNING   



          

Introduction   

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



Theory of Learning 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Theory of Language   

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

11 


Learning Style  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



19 

Leaner Language 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

23 



Learner Language Analysis   

 

 



 

 

 



 

26 


Summary 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

30 


Exercises 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

32 


Answer Key   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



37 

References 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



38 

 

Chapter 2



 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING METHOD 

Introduction   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



41 

Approach, Methods and Techniques   

 

 

 



 

 

41 



Foreign Language Teaching Methods 

 

 



 

 

 



46 

Summary 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



63 

Exercises 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



65 

Answer Key    

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

68 



References  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

69 


 

Chapter 3

 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN 



Introduction    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



71 

Current Curriculum Implemented in Indonesia  

 

 

 



 

71 


Designing English Syllabus    

 

 



 

 

 



 

72 


Principle of Designing English Syllabus  

 

 



 

 

 



76 

Principle of English Learning   

 

 

 



 

 

 



77 

Steps in Designing/Planning English Lesson  

 

 

 



 

78 


Summary 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 85 


Exercises  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 85 



Answer Key   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 86 

References  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 88 

 

 



 

Chapter 4

 

LANGUAGE TEACHING MEDIA 



Introduction   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 92 

      Techniques of Using Visuals Materials  

 

 

 



 

 

 93 



Techniques of Using Audio Materials  

 

 



 

 

 



 98 

Techniques of Using Audio-Visuals Materials  

 

 

 



 

107 


Information and communication Strategies    

 

 



 

 

113 



Making Email Account Using Google  

 

 



 

 

 



114 

Using Google for searching Resources   

 

 

 



 

 

118 



Finding Multimedia   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

121 



Creating a blog 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



122 

Websites Supporting English Language Teaching    

 

 

 



125 

Exercises  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



126 

References  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



128 

 

Chapter 5



 

LANGUAGE LEARNING EVALUATION 

Introduction    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



129 

Methods of Assessment  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

130 


Language Learning Assessment  

 

 



 

 

 



 

133 


The Assessment of the Process and Outcome of Learning English    

 

145 



Determining English Mastery Level    

 

 



 

 

 



146 

The Importance of Assessment  

 

 

 



 

 

 



147 

Exercises  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



151 

References  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



153 

 

 



 

PART II 


ENGLISH FUNCTIONAL TEXT 

 

 



Chapter 1

 

INTERPERSONAL TEXT 



Introduction    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



157 

Types of interpersonal Texts   

 

 

 



 

 

 



158 

Summary   

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



182 

References  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



183 

 

Chapter 2



 

TRANSACTIONAL TEXT 




Introduction   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



185 

Types of Transactional Texts   

 

 

 



 

 

 



185 

Summary  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



200 

References  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



201 

 

 



 

Chapter 3

 

SHORT FUNTIONAL TEXT 



Introduction    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



203 

Types of Short Functional Texts  

 

 

 



 

 

 



203 

Summary  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



215 

How to Teach Short Functional Texts   

 

 

 



 

 

215 



Exercises  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

218 


Answer Key    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



222 

References     

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

224 



 

Chapter 4

 

LONG FUNCTIONAL TEXT 



Introduction    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



226 

Types of Long Functional Texts 

 

 

 



 

 

 



226 

Summary   

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



266 

How to Teach Long Functional Texts  

 

 

 



 

 

268 



References 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 281 


 

 

Index 



 

Subject dan Author 

 

 

 



 


 


 

CHAPTER 1 



PRINCIPLES OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

TEACHING AND LEARNING 

(Prof. Endang Fauziati) 

1.1.


 

Introduction

 

Foreign language teachers have long been engaged in scientific approaches to foreign 



language teaching methodology based on experimentation and research on linguistic, 

psychological, and pedagogical foundations. They must have good understanding on the 

underlying principle or theoretical background which underpins the emergence of the teaching 

methodology. This provides them with a comprehensive grasp of theoretical foundations of 

foreign language teaching and can serve as an integrated framework within which a foreign 

language teacher can operate to formulate an understanding of how people learn foreign 

languages. Such an understanding will  make them enlightened language teachers, having 

adequate understanding of why they choose a particular method or technique of teaching for 

particular learners with particular learning objectives. This is also supposed to encourage 

teachers to develop an integrated understanding of the underlying principles of second or foreign 

language teaching methodology.  

This section will shed light on some principles or theories which are relevant for 

language teaching. Four major theories are deliberately chosen for the discussion here, namely: 

theory of learning, theory of language, learner learning style, learner language, and learner 

language analysis. 

 

1.2.



 

Theory of Learning 

There are four major theories of language acquisition and language learning which many 

psycholinguists and applied linguistics are familiar with, namely: Behaviorism,  Cognitivism, 

Humanism, and Constructivism.  These theories will be discussed in their relation  to foreign 

language teaching methodology. 




 

  



1.2.1.

 

Behaviorism 



Behaviorist theory is originated from Pavlov's experiment which indicates that stimulus 

and response work together. In his classical experiments he trained a dog to associate the sound 

of a tuning fork with salivation until the dog acquired a conditioned response that is salivation at 

the  sound of the tuning fork. A previously neutral stimulus (the sound of the tuning fork) had 

acquired the power to elicit a response (salivation) that was originally elicited by another 

stimulus (the smell of food). Watson (1913), deriving from Pavlov’s finding has named this 

theory Behaviorism and adopted classical conditioning theory to explain all types of learning. He 

rejects the mentalist notion of innateness and instinct. Instead, he believes that by the process of 

conditioning we can build a set of stimulus-response connections, and more complex behaviors 

are learned by building up series of responses. B.F. Skinner (1938) followed Watson’s tradition 

and added a unique dimension to Behaviorism;  he created a new concept called Operant 

conditioning. According to skinner, Pavlov’s classical conditioning (Respondent Conditioning) 

was a typical form of learning utilized mainly by animals and slightly applicable to account for 

human learning. Skinner’s Operant Conditioning tries to account for most of human learning and 

behavior. Operant behavior is behavior in which one operates on the environment. Within this 

model the importance of stimuli is de-emphasized. More emphasis, however, is on the 

consequence of stimuli. So, reinforcement is the key element. Therefore, the teaching 

methodology based on skinner’s view rely the classroom procedures on the controlled practice of 

verbal operants under carefully designed schedules of reinforcement. Operant conditioning, then, 

is a mechanistic approach to learning. External forces select stimuli and reinforce responses until 

desired behavior is conditioned to occur. In sum, we can say that learning is basically viewed as 

a process of conditioning behavior. From this tenet comes the definition of learning as “a change 

in behavior”. In accordance with Skinner’s theory, Brook (1964: 46) has defined learning as “a 

change in performance that occurs under the conditions of practice”. 

Skinner’s theory of behaviorism has profoundly influenced the direction of the foreign 

language teaching. The simplicity and directness of this theory—learning is a mechanical habit 

formation and proceeds by means of the frequent reinforcement of a stimulus and response 

sequence—has enormous impact on language teaching. It provides the learning theory, which 

underpins the widely used Audiolingual Method (ALM) of the 1950s and 1960s. This method, 



 

which will be familiar to many language teachers, has laid down a set of guiding methodological 



principles based on two concepts: (1) the behaviorist stimulus-response concept and (2) an 

assumption that foreign language learning should reflect and imitate the perceived processes of 

mother tongue learning.   Classroom environment in Audiolingualism, therefore, is arranged in 

which there is a maximum amount of mimicry, memorization and pattern drills on the part of the 

learners. Ausubel (1968) calls this type of learning as rote learning. On the other part, the teacher 

is supposed to give rewards to the utterances coming closest to the model recorder and to 

extinguish the utterances, which do not. 

Skinner’s theory of behaviorism has profoundly influenced the direction of the second or 

foreign language teaching. The simplicity and directness of this theory—learning is a mechanical 

habit formation and proceeds by means of the frequent reinforcement of a stimulus and response 

sequence—has enormous impact on language teaching  Classroom environment in 

Audiolingualism, therefore, is arranged in which there is a maximum amount of mimicry, 

memorization and pattern drills  on  the part of the learners. On the other part, the teacher is 

supposed to give rewards to the utterances coming closest to the model recorder and to 

extinguish the utterances, which do not. 

 

1.2.2.


 

Cognitivism 

Skinner’s theory of verbal behavior has got a number of critics, especially from cognitive 

psychologists; among them was Noam Chomsky (1959) who argued that Skinner’s model was 

not adequate to account for language acquisition. In Chomsky’s view much of language use is 

not imitated behavior but is created a new  from underlying knowledge of abstract rules. 

Sentences are not learned by imitation and repetition but ‘generated’ from the learner’s 

underlying ‘Competence’ (Chomsky, 1966). Cognitivism believes that people are rational beings 

that require active participation in order to learn, and whose actions are a consequence of 

thinking. Changes in behavior are observed, but only as an indication of what is occurring in the 

learner’s head. Cognitivism  focuses on the inner mental activities (the processes of knowing) 

such as thinking, memory, knowing, and problem-solving. Knowledge can be seen as schema 

and learning is a change in a learner’s schemata. The mind just like a computer: information 

comes in, is being processed, and leads to certain outcomes. So, learning is considered as an 

active, constructive, cumulative, and self-directed process that is dependent on the mental 



 

activities of the learner (Sternberg 1996). Cognitive theories, therefore,  have replaced 



behaviorism in 1960s as the dominant paradigm.  

Cognitive psychology, together with Chomsky’s transformational grammar, gave rise to 

its own method of language learning called Cognitive Approach or Cognitive Code Learning. 

The role of the teachers is to recognize the importance of the students’ mental assets and mental 

activity in learning. Their task is also to organize the material being presented in such a manner 

that what is to be learned will be meaningful to the learners. The classroom procedures 

emphasize understanding rather than habit formation (cf. Audiolingual Method). All learning is 

to be meaningful. In so doing, the teacher can (1) build on what the students already know; (2) 

help the students relate new material to themselves, their life experiences, and their previous 

knowledge; (3) avoids rote learning (except perhaps in the case of vocabulary); (4) use graphic 

and schematic procedures to clarify relationships; (5) utilize both written and spoken language in 

order to appeal to as many senses as possible; (6) attempt to select the most appropriate teaching-

Learning situation for the students’ involvement.; and use inductive, deductive, or discovery 

learning procedures as the situation warrants. 

 

1.2.3.


 

Humanism 

Humanistic psychology emerged in the 1950s as a departure from the scientific analysis 

of Skinner’s Behaviorism and even from Ausubel’s cognitive theory. In humanistic view, human 

being is a whole person who not only has physic and cognition, but more importantly has feeling 

and emotion. Learning, therefore, has more affective focus than behaviorist and cognitive ones; it 

focuses more on the development of individual’s self-concept and his personal sense of reality. 

From 1970s, humanism in education has attracted more and more people’s attention. According 

to its theories, the receiver in education is first a human being, then a learner. If a person cannot 

satisfy his basic needs physically and psychologically, he will surely fail to concentrate on his 

learning whole-heartedly. Affect is not only the basic needs of human body, but also the 

condition and premise of the other physical and psychological activities. So learning and the 

affective factors are closely connected.  

Wang (2005: 1) notes that there are three prominent figures in this field, namely: Erikson, 

Maslow, and Rogers. Erik Erikson who developed his theory from Sigmund Freud claims that 

“human psychological development depends not only on the way in which individuals pass 




 

through predetermined maturational stages, but on the challenges that are set by society at 



particular times in their lives” (1963: 11). The second figure is Abraham Maslow (1968), who 

proposes a famous hierarchy of needs---deficiency (or maintenance) needs and being (or growth) 

needs. Deficiency needs are directly related to a person’s psychological or biological balance, 

such as the requirements of food, water or sleep. Being needs are related to the fulfillment of 

individual potential development. The third one is Carl Rogers (1969), who advocates that 

human beings have a natural potential for learning, but this will take place only when the subject 

matter is perceived to be of personal relevance to the learners and when it involves active 

participation of the learners. Although these three humanists have different ideas, their theories 

are all connected with humanism and  their theories contribute greatly to the emergence of 

humanistic approach. (Wang, 2005: 2) Among these three, Rogers has been the most influential 

figure in the field of foreign language teaching methodology.        

According to Rogers (in Brown, 1980: 76), the inherent principle of human behavior is 

his ability to adapt and to grow in the direction that can enhance his existence. Human being 

needs a non threatening environment to grow and to learn to become a fully-functioning person. 

He  states that fully-functioning person has qualities such as: (1) openness to experience (being 

able to accept reality, including one's feelings; if one cannot be open to one’s feelings, he cannot 

be open to actualization; (2) existential living (living in the here-and-now);  (3) organismic 

trusting (we should trust ourselves—do what feels right and what comes natural); (4) experiential 

freedom (the fully-functioning person acknowledges that feeling of freedom and takes 

responsibility for his choices) and (5)   creativity (if we feel free and responsible, we will act 

accordingly, and participate in the world; a fully-functioning person will feel obliged by their 

nature to contribute to the actualization of others, even life itself). 

Humanistic principles have important implications for education. According to this 

approach, the focus of education is learning and not teaching. The goal of education is the 

facilitation of learning. Learning how to learn is more important than being taught by the 

superior (teacher) who unilaterally decides what will be taught. What needed, then, is real 

facilitator of learning.  A teacher as a facilitator should have the following characteristics: (1) He 

must be genuine and real, putting away the impression of superiority; (2) He must have trust or 

acceptance from his students as valuable individuals; and (3) He needs to communicate openly 

and emphatically with his students and vice versa. (Brown, 1980: 77)  




 

Humanistic approach has given rise to the existence of foreign language teaching 



methodology such as Community Language Learning by Curran, Silent Way by Gattegno and 

Suggestopedia by Lazanov, and Communicative Language Teaching. There are several concepts 

that are closely allied to Communicative Language Teaching such as Task-Based Language 

Teaching, Cooperative Language Learning, Collaborative Language Learning, Active learning, 

and Active, Interactive, Communicative, Effective, and Joyful Learning or popularly known in 

Indonesia as PAIKEM (Pendekatan yang aktif, interaktif, komunikatif, efektif, dan 



menyenangkan). These terms are simply expression for the latest fashions in foreign language 

teaching. They could be used to label the current concerns within a Communicative Approach 

frame work (Brown 2004: 40). These foreign language teaching methods  focus on a conducive 

context for learning, a non-threatening environment where learners  can freely learn what they 

need to. There are aspects of language learning which may call upon conditioning process, other 

aspects need a meaningful cognitive process,  and yet others depend upon the non-threatening 

environment in which learners can learn freely and willingly. Each aspect, however, is required 

and appropriate for certain type of purpose of language learning.  

 

1.2.4.


 

Constructivism  

The latest catchword in educational field is constructivism which is often applied both to 

learning theory (how people learn) and to epistemology (the nature of knowledge). In pedagogy, 

constructivism is often contrasted with the behaviorist approach. Constructivism takes a more 

cognitive approach as Glaserfled (in Murphy, 1997: 5) argued “From the constructivist's 

perspective, learning is not a stimulus-response phenomenon. It requires self-regulation and 

building of conceptual structures through reflection and abstraction.”  

Constructivism is a philosophy of learning founded on the premise that, by reflecting on 

our experiences, we construct our own understanding of the world we live in. In other words, it 

refers to the idea that learners construct knowledge for themselves. This is in consonant with 

Holzer (1994: 2) who states that "the basic idea of constructivism is that knowledge must be 

constructed by the learner. It cannot be supplied by the teacher." Each learner individually and/or 

socially constructs meaning as he or she learns. The construction of meaning is learning; there is 

no other kind. The dramatic consequences of this view are twofold, namely: (1) we have to focus 

on the learner in thinking about learning (not on the subject/lesson to be taught); and (2) There is 




 

no knowledge independent of the meaning attributed to experience (constructed) by the learner, 



or community of learners. 

Based on Piaget's definitions of knowledge, Bringuier (in Holzer, 1994: 2) provides clue 

of how learning can be nurtured or developed. He states that “Learning is an interaction between 

subject and object. It is a perpetual construction made by exchanges between thought and its 

object”. Thus, the construction of knowledge is a dynamic process that requires the active 

engagement of the learners who will be responsible for ones' learning, while, the teacher only 

creates an effective learning environment.  

Current conception of constructivism tends to be more holistic than traditional 

information-processing theories (Cunningham, 1991). It has extended the traditional focus on 

individual learning to address collaborative and social dimensions of learning. Hence, this often 

referred to as social constructivism. Another sister term is Communal Constructivism  that was 

introduced by  Bryn Holmes in 2001. Social constructivist scholars view learning as an active 

process where learners should learn to discover principles, concepts and facts for themselves; 

hence it is also important to encourage guesswork and intuitive thinking in learners. The social 

constructivist model thus emphasizes the importance of the relationship between the student and 

the instructor in the learning process; individuals make meanings through the  interactions with 

each other and with the environment they live in. Knowledge is thus a product of humans and is 

socially and culturally constructed (Prawat and Floden 1994).  In sum, learning is a social 

process; it is not a process that only takes place  inside our minds (Cognitivism), nor is it a 

passive development of our behaviors that is shaped by external forces (Behaviorism). 

Meaningful learning occurs when individuals are engaged in social activities (McMahon, 1997). 

This current conception of social constructivism, according to Wood (1998: 39) can possibly be 

viewed as the bringing together of aspects of the work of Piaget with that of Lev Vygotsky.  



Bagan alir pelaksanaan sertifikasi guru dalam jabatan 2015 
No.  materi 
Memperhatikan k. 2006 dan k. 2013 (16 jp)  
L.   tata tertib peserta plpg  
Peserta  yang  tidak  memenuhi  panggilan  plpg  tanpa 
Perlengkapan peserta 
Perlengkapan umum: 
Pendaftaran peserta  
Tata tertib di wisma/tempat penginapan 
Tempat pelaksanaan plpg 
No.  alamat 
No.  aspek yang dinilai
Skor total   
No.  kriteria 
No.  kriteria 
No.  aspek yang dinilai
B.  pendekatan/strategi pembelajaran 
E.  penilaian proses dan hasil belajar 
Pengantar  kepala pusat pengembangan profesi pendidik 
Pendahuluan   
Penilaian  kinerja  guru
Etika  profesi  guru.
Kebijakan pengembangan profesi guru
Kebijakan dan pemerataan guru  
Kewenangan pemerintah provinsi atau kabupaten/kota 
Kegiatan selain pendidikan dan pelatihan 
Pengembangan diri 
Publikasi ilmiah  
Karya inovatif 
Kompetensi pedagogik  
Kompetensi kepribadian 
Latihan dan renungan 
Bab iii  penilaian kinerja 
Sm    : standar minimal
Tahap penilaian 
Tahap pelaporan 
Pembinaan    dan
Pengembangan profesi  
Unsur penunjang  
Negosiasi dan perdamaian 
Konsiliasi dan perdamaian  
Advokasi litigasi 
Advokasi nonlitigasi 
Penghargaan guru berprestasi 
Penghargaan  bagi  guru  sd  berdedikasi  di  daerah  khusus/terpencil  
Penghargaan bagi guru plb/pk berdedikasi  
Penghargaan tanda kehormatan satyalancana pendidikan 
Penghargaan bagi guru yang berhasil dalam pembelajaran 
Penghargaan guru pemenang olimpiade 
Penghargaan lainnya 
Tunjangan profesi 
Tunjangan fungsional 
Tunjangan khusus 
Maslahat tambahan 
Hubungan guru dengan peserta didik 
Hubungan guru dengan orangtua/wali siswa  
Hubungan guru dengan masyarakat  
Hubungan guru dengan sekolah dan rekan sejawat 
Hubungan guru dengan profesi  
Hubungan guru dengan organisasi profesi 
Hubungan guru dengan pemerintah 
Kurikulum   2013 
Chemistry 1. classification, composition, 
Data  display
Kerangka kompetensi abad 21
Perlunya mempersiapkan proses penilaian yang 
Pergeseran paradigma belajar abad 21
Proses penilaian yang mendukung kreativitas
Kerangka dasar dan struktur kurikulum 
Kurikulum 2013
Ktsp 2006 kurikulum 2013
Perbedaan esensial kurikulum 2013
Struktur kurikulum
Langkah penguatan implementasi 
Proses karakteristik penguatan
Kunci keberhasilan implementasi kurikulum 2013
Rancangan struktur kurikulum sd
Rasional ipa dan ips di sekolah dasar
Pentingnya tematik terpadu : 
Pentingnya tematik terpadu :
No komponen
Karakteristik kurikulum 2013: 
Analisis ki/kd dan perancangan rpp: 
Contoh: matematika:
Tingkatan sikap
No. tingkat kompetensi
Perbedaan antara penelitian tindakan dengan penelitian formal 
Pelaksanaan tindakan 
Evaluasi dan refleksi 
Identifikasi temuan umum 
Prosedur penelitian 
Jadwal penelitian  
Tinjauan pustaka 
Kualitas rujukan 
Implikasi hasil penelitian 
Ucapan terima kasih 
Catatan terkait penerbitan artikel 
Lampiran 1 :   
Pembelajaran kontekstual 
Kegiatan  waktu (jp) 
Total  30 
Kerja kelompok/mandiri 
Kompetensi inti  
Materi pembelajaran 
Media, alat, dan sumber pembelajaran 
Langkah-langkah pembelajaran 
Kegiatan inti 
Kegiatan penutup 
Alat/bahan pembelajaran 
Vygotsky’s concept:  
Socio- cultural 
Field independent
Analytic vs. global learning styles
Reflective learning style
An auditory learner
Tactile/kinesthetic  learners
Multi-sensory learners
Extraversion/introversion
Tolerance for ambiguity
Intolerant learners
Systematicity
Dynamicity:  
Fossilization
Speech act theory
A. give definition to the following terminology. use dictionary of linguistics or applied 
Language learning is a developmental process.
Language learning is a decision-making process. 
Language learning is an emotional experience.
Pembelaran (rpp)
Imitation  manipulation
Lesson plan   
Printed materials
Audio and video 
A. questions and tasks 
Assessing listening comprehension  
Assessing speaking 
Toyota alphard ’09, 6 cyl standard, good eng, body, and paint. new 
Assessing reading comprehension 
Lowest rates out of state (unassisted calls) 
Remedy program  
Enrichment program  
Introducing oneself 
Excuse me vs.  i’m sorry 
Forgiving  rejecting 
Conversation model
Conversation model 
Offering sympathy 
Compliments on possessions
Types  example 
Ordering/commanding
The use of simple and informal words 
Frequent use of compounds  (
Friendly invitation letter  
Business invitation letter 
Rsvp or r.s.v.p. is adopted from 
Teaching how to write an invitation letter 
Confirmation 
Teaching how to write a postcard 
Volcanic fumes are hazardous to your health and can be life-threatening. 
Key answer  check point 
Invitation letter 
The expressions used in invitation letter.
Learning: technology in education, action research, literacy development.
Sample invitation letter
Complication  
Language features 
Example of a narrative text 
The generic structure of recount text 
List of abstract nouns  
My pet  identification 
Positive  comparative 
Things dissolve in water 
Writing  write a procedure text and identify its structures: 
Vocabulary  consult your dictionary to find the meaning and the pronunciation of the following 
Vocabulary  change these nouns to their singular forms 
Text elements 
Blessing behind tragedy 
Vocabulary  create adjectives from the following words by adding the suffixes -ful and -less. the 
Recommendati on 
Television for social construction 
Implementing character education in all level schools 
The zoo job story 
Vocabulary  match up the adverbs on the left with their opposites on the right. 
Answer the following questions based on the text above: 
Television: the best invention of the twentieth century? 
Writing   analyze the texts  above based on its elements. paraphrase the points of each 
Writing   choose and analyze the texts below (1) or (2) based on its elements. paraphrase the 
Japanese urged to try rioting
Text elements 
Interpretative 
Writing   what are the generic structures of the text entitled “2012  film review” 
The list of words: 
Writing   
Exploration  task 1 
Human body energy 
Elaboration  task 1 
More exercises 
Why summer daylight is longger than winter daylight; an explanation text 
References   



Share with your friends:
1   ...   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   ...   410


The database is protected by copyright ©userg.info 2017
send message

    Main page

bosch
camera
chevrolet
epson
fiat
Honda
iphone
mitsubishi
nissan
Panasonic
Sony
volvo
xiaomi
Xperia
yamaha