Fiat manual



Download 315.1 Kb.
fiat
Page1/72
Date13.11.2018
Size315.1 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   72


 

T

T



h

h

e



e

 

 



F

F

I



I

A

A



T

T

 



 

S

S



y

y

s



s

t

t



e

e

m



m

:

:



 

 

F



F

u

u



n

n

c



c

t

t



i

i

o



o

n

n



a

a

l



l

 

 



I

I

d



d

i

i



o

o

g



g

r

r



a

a

p



p

h

h



i

i

c



c

 

 



A

A

s



s

s

s



e

e

s



s

s

s



m

m

e



e

n

n



t

t

 



 

T

T



e

e

m



m

p

p



l

l

a



a

t

t



e

e

 



  

 

 

For use with Interpersonally-based interventions 



including Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) 

or FAP-enhanced Treatments 

 

 

 



Glenn M. Callaghan, Ph.D. 

San Jose State University 

 

 



Please contact Glenn Callaghan  

for permission to use this assessment system at 

One Washington Square 

Department of Psychology 

San Jose State University 

San Jose CA 95192-0120 

 

phone:  (408) 924-5610 



fax: (408) 924-5605 

 

email: glennc@email.sjsu.edu 



 

©

 Feb 2001, G. M. Callaghan, Ph.D.




FIAT Manual Instructions and User Information 

 

 



This manual is designed to be used with the Functional Idiographic Assessment 

Template (FIAT) in conjunction with Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) or FAP-

enhanced treatments.  The FIAT manual specifies the classes of behaviors used with 

the Client Forms (FIAT-C pre and FIAT-C post) and Therapist Forms (FIAT-T pre and 

FIAT-T post) of the assessment template.   

 

Minimal Requirements 

 

The use of the manual assumes that therapists have a working knowledge of the 



principles of FAP (Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991) and have an understanding of the 

administration of assessment devices in accordance with the ethical principles of test 

administration, or are receiving training in one or both of these areas.  It is also highly 

recommended that users have a basic understanding of the FAP Rating Scale (FAPRS-

2; Callaghan, Ruckstuhl, & Follette, 1999). 

 

Understanding of Response Classes. Users are also expected to have an 

understanding of behavior analysis, particularly of functional response classes of 

behavior.  A response class is a group of Clinically Relevant Behaviors (CRBs) that all 

function to have a particular effect regardless of form the response might take (i.e., its 

topographical features).  This distinction requires therapists to differentiate the effect the 

client’s behavior is having rather than merely watching what the client is doing.  

Functional classes are understood idiographically and are based on the analysis of 

each particular client’s problem and effective behaviors.  For example, a client may cry, 

attack, or skip sessions.  If each of these behaviors functions to allow the client to avoid 

talking about an emotional experience, even though the behaviors have different 

topographies, they could all be instances of the same response class.  It is the 

therapist’s task to recognize the function of a response rather than identifying a 

behavior based merely on its topography.   

 

Response classes in this manual are grouped into five main categories.  Each of the 



classes is defined by a basic function served by the behaviors in the class.  The classes 

described below are non-orthogonal.  Each of the classes may overlap with other 

behavioral problems or deficits that the client exhibits.  If the client shows problems in 

one class, it should not be assumed that the client does not show problems in another 

class.   

 



Criteria for inclusion of class as problem behavior 
Organization of the manual 
Rev. 11-02-02 
Client exemplars 
I nstructions for filling out the 
Instance of the week
Problems with appropriate contextual control 
Problems with appropriate contextual control
Unclear self-disclosure  
Ineffective or unclear description of emotional experience 
Contextual cues/discriminative stimulus functions 
Response repertoire 
Excessive requests or demands for needs to be met  
Client exemplars for class a 
Insensitivity to feedback 
Problems providing feedback to others 
Client exemplars for class b 
Indirect/ineffective attempts to resolve conflict 
Client exemplars for class c 
Therapist assessment questions for class c 
Inaccurate self-disclosure 
Excessive self-disclosure or seeking closeness  
Client exemplars for class d 
Therapist assessment questions for class d 
Client exemplars for class e 


Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   72


The database is protected by copyright ©userg.info 2017
send message

    Main page

bosch
camera
chevrolet
epson
fiat
Honda
iphone
mitsubishi
nissan
Panasonic
Sony
volvo
xiaomi
yamaha